The photographic explorations of a former film student.

Photo Club Shoot

More Post Office

I haven’t really been into photo editing lately. I want off the computer doing something more three dimensional. Again my blog is late, and again my blog is Post Office.

OldButtons

Old control buttons on the second floor.

Clock

Main floor clock over the doors.

LightFixture

Lobby light fixture. Note the detail in the lower glass. I’m not sure how the background lighting turned out like this, but I like the colors.

 

Next Time: Flowers?

They are coming up, and, like most people, I’ve been spending a lot of time around home these days.


Post Office Detail

One of my goals for 2020 is to blog monthly. My apologies for being a couple days late on the first one. These are a couple architectural details from a photo club outing to the Old Post Office in Chicago. I decided to do black and white on the first and split toning on the second in Lightroom for fun.

DoorDetailWindowCorner

Maybe I will do one for Valentines day in a couple weeks. Otherwise, I can continue with the Post Office photos.


Christmas Wish

It’s a bit late (an unfortunate theme for me this year), but I still wanted to wish you all a Merry Christmas. I wish you warmth, light, and comfort in this often dark and cold season. May you find hope and good things in this time, and in the year to come.

ChristmasFloral


The Aged and Beautiful Yerkes Observatory

Last month, the local photo club decided to visit Yerkes Observatory. It is connected with the University of Chicago, but located in a small town in Wisconsin. Built in 1895, it houses what was the largest telescope of the time. Many astrophysicists studied there over the years. Albert Einstein even visited in the early 1920s. You can read more about the observatory here: http://astro.uchicago.edu/yerkes/

We began with an educational tour and a look at the telescope itself. Not the best conditions for photography, but I had to get a few shots.

The floor in the telescope area moves up and down. During the tour, we were sitting on the edges of the building, which remain stationary. Our guide announced that he would go over to the desk and raise the center floor while whistling the theme from Star Trek. He was rather good at it. Here is the somewhat Original Series looking control desk.

ControlDesk

After lunch, Dad and I stuck around for exterior photographs. This is the largest dome anong with the entryway to the building.

EntryAndLgDome

On the other end, there are two smaller domes and more ornate carvings.

CornerDetail

Dad wanted to stick around and see if the sun would come out. While waiting, I photographed some of the carving on the entryway pillars. The Satyr is a caricature of Mr. Yerkes. According to the tour guide, he was one of the not so well-loved wealthy industrialists of his time. He built the observatory to improve his image with the public, which is why it is such a grand building.

YerkesSatyr

The architect was a bit eccentric. No one knows what all the caricatures and symbols on the building mean because he had his son burn his papers upon his death. He also made fun of Rockefeller. Originally, there was a bee stinging Rockefeller’s nose, but he visited the observatory, and the powers that be thought they should have all the bees chiseled off the columns before he arrived.

Rockefeller

Moons, stars, and the man in the moon also grace the pillars.

ManInMoon

Wandering around the building, I noticed that the side doors were not as well-kept as the fronts – not at all. This did not surprise me, as I imaging keeping up a grand old building of that size is a challenge. The peeling paint and old door knob had a nice rustic quality about them, so I thought they’d make an interesting shot.

SideDoorknob

Finally, Dad got what he was waiting for. The sun came out.

EntrySunnyDomeLS

Next Time: Flowers or Old Camera

Spring is coming slowly. If it doesn’t come fast enough, I’ve purchased an old Kodak folding Autograph and an Argus I’d like to do posts on sometime.


Club Shoot Archive

Here are a couple of archive photos from January’s photo club table top night. I brought my own light source and reflectors as well as some subject matter, but it is kind of a free for all, so I ended up photographing mostly items the other members brought. Mine ended up being mostly floral items and a vintage green glass dish.

YellowFlowerInGreenDish

PinkScarf

Next Time: Sand Dunes

I went to Michigan and checked out a National Lakeshore area.


Birds of Prey

These photos are from a club shoot for the photo club I belong to. Apparently, one of the long-time members knows someone in raptor rescue and they arrange for the club to photograph a few non-releasable birds every year. The rescue uses these birds for educational purposes, so they were glad to tell us about all of them.

The peregrine falcon was the most vocal and energetic of all the birds. We were told she was used for hunting and retired due to a foot problem. Now she’s a favorite of school children at educational programs.

peregrine falcon

She also likes water.

WaterTheBird

This is Phoenix, so named because he barely survived a nasty high-speed collision with a truck. He’s a very impressive bird, although unfortunately mentally challenged these days.

Phonenix

This is Ulysses. I could swear he looked directly at one of the other club members who said his name.

OwlEars

I don’t know how to spell this lovely girl’s name. It means “Beautiful One” in Navajo. Very appropriate. She is a Barn Owl raised by another group for educational purposes. We were told Barn Owls are declining in number because of habitat loss. As the name implies, they tend to live in rural areas and eat mice.

BarnOwl

 

Next Time: Japanese Garden

The best place in town for calm and relaxation. Also pretty cool.